ChmPlus Pro - CHM Reader

Last modified
Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Category

Description of App

CHM+ Reader (ChmPlus) is a feature-rich CHM (Microsoft Compiled HTML Help) document / ebook reader for iPad, iPhone and iPod touch. CHM+ Reader is currently the best CHM reader available for iOS.

CHM+ Reader now supports highlight / annotation, bookmark and search (find on page & document-wide search).

The only CHM reader for iOS that supports document-wide search!

CHM/ePub Document Support:

  • Highlight / annotation
  • Bookmark
  • Search (find on page & document-wide search)
  • Open CHM files instantly (even with huge files)
  • Supports CHM files in different languages
  • Supports pinch to zoom
  • Navigate through table of contents
  • Supports full screen mode
  • Look up words with Google / Wiktionary
  • Swipe to turn page
  • Supports auto rotation and orientation lock
  • Support CHM document that contains .mht pages

Long press on an image to:

  1. save the image to photo album
  2. copy the image to clipboard (and paste it into your email)
  • night mode (white text on black background)
  • Built-in web browser for viewing images and external links

File Management:

  • Transfer files via Wi-Fi (FTP & HTTP) / iTunes File Sharing
  • Create/copy/move/rename/delete files and folders
  • Support opening document with other applications
  • Import document from other applications
  • Import document from Email
  • Edit existing text documents
  • Send multiple Email attachments
  • Create .zip archives
  • Save image to Photos

Supported File Types:

  • .chm (Microsoft Compiled HTML Help)
  • .epub (electronic publication)
  • MS Office - .doc, .ppt., .xls, .docx, .xlsx, .pptx
  • iWork '08/'09
  • PDF, HTML, RTF, .mht, Safari webarchives and text files
  • .zip, .rar, .7z,.gz, .tar file types
  • High resolution images
  • Audio and video

Note: support for .mht format is experimental, the App might not be able to open large .mht files. CHM+ Reader is currently the only CHM reader that supports .mht format.

SUPPORT
http://langui.net/chmplus/

Version

3.1.2

Free or Paid

Paid

Apple Watch Support

Not Known

Device(s) App Was Tested On

iPhone
iPod Touch

Accessibility Comments

The app is fully accessible using Voiceover and the good thing is that all controls are labelled clearly.

VoiceOver Performance

VoiceOver reads all page elements.

Button Labeling

All buttons are clearly labeled.

Usability

The app is fully accessible with VoiceOver and is easy to navigate and use.

Other Comments

If you are an avid reader and often had hard times reading chm files on your beloved iOS device, then this one should be the answer. even though the program is paid, the good thing is that there is a free version, of course its limitations is in the number of files you can keep at any given moment. If my memory saves me well, it should be 7 files. The chm format is the native Windows format for most manuals and other ebooks, mostly programming texts. The beauty of this format is in its navigation: you can easily search or skip between toc items flawlessly. At last, for us who use Voiceover, Chm+ reader is here. try it out.

Recommendations

1 people have recommended this app

Most recently recommended by ProWorld2013 4 years 2 months ago

Options

Comments

Submitted by alex wallis on Sunday, June 10, 2012

I Just purchased this app, and I agree all controls are fully accessible, however not all formats are accessible with VoiceOver. It reads html and chm fine, however there are problems with epub and pdf. With pdf files nothing will read at all with VoiceOver, and i'm not sure how easy this would be for a developer to fix, as we don't know how apple have done it with iBooks. With epub files, you can access the table of contents with no problem, but after you have clicked on something from the table of contents there doesn't seem any way to read the actual text of an entry you have selected. I think I might try dropping tthe developer a message about these issues, as the app does seem quite nice. Its also worth noting that files can be copied to the app without the use of itunes, you can just use windows copy and paste if you have a third party app that lets you access app folders. You just have to place any files or folders you want to read in the documents folder. The other really nice thing about this app, is that you can organise your files inside multiple levels of directories, so you can have say an author folder for example then a series folder and then your books. This will make organisation and management so much easier than using iBooks. If the pdf and epub formats could be made accessible, I would ditch iBooks and switch to this as my main ebook reader, as the app doesn't use a fancy database to track its files, so its free of itunes.

Sure, there are some issues with pdfs. I also noticed that most apps have got hard time playing it nicely with voiceover when it comes to pdf files. other than ibooks, no other program handles PDF files well.However, with epub, I often have no problems with most of these: it just opens them as chm files. In any case, I think it needs to be improved though and I think it's good to get hold of the developer. He is responsive. BTW, I just wish he could add upport for Mobi files so that we could read kindle books as well. As for ditching iBooks, I think the only problem would be with digitally protected content you buy from iBookstore. It appears chm+Reader is good at DRM-free books.

Submitted by alex wallis on Sunday, June 10, 2012

Hi, I have contacted the developer about the issues with pdf and epub files, the only way to contact him seems to be through a public blog, so guess we will see what happens. regarding Ibooks and protected drm, ebooks I think that's a given that the only way to read them is by using iBooks, unless like me you strip it out to make the file readable with any app you like. Its partly for this reason I won't by ebooks from the appstore unless its something I really want to read, or I can't find it anywhere else. When I do have to by from the store, stripping the drm is the first thing I do.

Submitted by jrjolley (not verified) on Sunday, June 10, 2012

Alex, Please will you stop going on about jail breaking devices. Some of us actually want to pay for content and agree with the publisher getting a cut of the book sale. Seems to me that many want to have there cake and eat it, but it has to be remembered that Apple are responsible to publishers and have to add in the DRM. The actuality is, what's the problem. It's unobtrusive, doesn't take up unnecessary time for anyone and isn't an issue. If you want to play with the Apple stuff and don't like it, why bother wasting time? Either way, cary on pirating as most of you jail breakers probably are anyways.

Submitted by alex wallis on Monday, June 11, 2012

Hi, firstly before getting into the reply I have received from the developer, I would like to address james's post telling me to stop going on about jailbreaking apple content. the method I use for removing drm is not designed to steel content from apple, in fact completely the reverse. You actually have to pay for books legitimately in the app store, and you can't remove drm from books someone gives you a copy of. This is because the book has to be authorised to be accessible on your devices, and must be authorised by itunes before you can remove the drm. I don't see why we shouldn't be allowed to use content that we have legally paid for how we see fit. I am considering posting a guide on removal of drm on the site, as its not steeling from apple, and its simply adapting content for use how you like. also, apple music is now drm free, and we can use it how we like so surely the same should be true of ebooks. Also, drm removal does leave identification tags in place on the decrypted files so unless other software was used to deliberately remove those which I haven't done its still possible for people to find out who's a particular copy of a book is. also, all the information and software to remove drm is in the public domain anyway, you just have to go to the right places, honestly people should stop being so proodish like the mods on the viPhone list, I hardly think apple will care about already publicly available information being redistributed, and our community is so small we are not worth their attention.

Submitted by alex wallis on Monday, June 11, 2012

I received a reply from the app developer Its very positive, I sent the message yesterday and had his reply this morning. He said that he wasn't aware of accessibility issues until I wrote to him, he said that he has done some testing with epub files and they seem to read fine with Voiceover. So, I will have another go with epub files I have been using and if I don't get anywhere I will send him some example files to look at. He was also positive about pdf files not being accessible, he said this will take time to fix as it will involve rewriting the pdf viewer, but from the content of his message it sounds like he might actually be going to do it. Very encouraging anyway.

Submitted by Sandra on Monday, June 11, 2012

Can I use this app to open a .zip-file that I receive via Email and which contains rtf-files, and then open and read the rtf-files without having to unzip the archive and save the rtf somewhere else, first?

This message highlights much thinking that I seriously disapprove of within the blindness community. Many seem to think that, because we are blind, we are above everyone else and can do as we like. I want to take the time to respond to all points Alex brings up: 1. "the method I use for removing drm is not designed to steel content from apple, in fact completely the reverse. You actually have to pay for books legitimately in the app store, and you can't remove drm from books someone gives you a copy of. This is because the book has to be authorised to be accessible on your devices, and must be authorised by itunes before you can remove the drm." Have you considered that this isn't an Apple issue? As I have already said, publishers have rights and it is thinking like this that loses us content in the long run. We expect equal access to material and then cause trouble for ourselves as a blind community. Justification for this is similar to saying that I have the right to make bombs and become a terrorist because bomb making instructions and religious extremism is all over the internet. We don't, and stripping DRM because you feel all hurt that you can't play books on other devices isn't a legit excuse anyway as Apple provides many devices that play those books. If you can't find a suitable device to play the books, don't use Apple kit. iPads, phones, pods, all the touch devices play these files. We are not restricted and it's not even as if navigation is much of an issue either. 2. "I don't see why we shouldn't be allowed to use content that we have legally paid for how we see fit." We live in a world of change. We aren't in a free open society with regards to content delivery and with good reason. P2P users/stealers in my opinion have enhanced the use of DRM in the first place. The fact that publishers have to do this for legal reasons anyway keeps escaping people's notice. 3. "I am considering posting a guide on removal of drm on the site, as its not steeling from apple, and its simply adapting content for use how you like. also, apple music is now drm free, and we can use it how we like so surely the same should be true of ebooks." Again, publishers, publishers, publishers. Music is only DRM free on the iTunes store after many years of discussion with labels. Believe me, they don't want it to be DRM free, they'd rather have there stuff protected. It was the monopoly on stuff playing on iPods only that really was the issue. M4A files are usable on many devices these days, so really they are using a tactic to make more money in the long term. Books are entirely different because of the format of the files. We don't expect to view spreadsheets in word processors because the file format isn't compatible do we? It's the same for iBooks. iBooks is an experience in reading, if you don't like it, get off Apple's lawn and stick to other formats. As to writing a guide on how to do it, I hope the mods ban you from here permanently for even suggesting it. It is about time that honest payers and users stick up for themselves. Blind people seem to expect everything for free as I already pointed out and it's not exactly fair to us who are trying to improve the reading situation for VI folks. We have restrictions as it is, why make them tighter. 4. "drm removal does leave identification tags in place on the decrypted files so unless other software was used to deliberately remove those which I haven't done its still possible for people to find out who's a particular copy of a book is." You haven't removed the tags with ID info in apparently so that makes it alright? What a ridiculous thing to suggest, just because you haven't, doesn't mean people won't. Really, it is a question of fairness rather than openness. Again, publishers rights are important. We've all taken books from illegal sources as VI folks because we had no choice. Now that we do, don't rock the boat and mess things up for other people. 5. "also, all the information and software to remove drm is in the public domain anyway, you just have to go to the right places" See point 1. 6. "honestly people should stop being so proodish like the mods on the viPhone list, I hardly think apple will care about already publicly available information being redistributed, and our community is so small we are not worth their attention." Firstly, Apple will care about helping us in the future if we at least don't attempt to play fair. Saying that just because I buy a book gives me the rights to do whatever I want doesn't hold much water either. In that case, the RNIB in the UK can braille any books they want because they are in print. Fact, they can't. They have to get publishers rights to do it. As to us being a small community, that doesn't make it right that we should also be the community that cheats and steals from the system. The VI community should be grateful to have books to read on these devices at all, we're not exactly swamped with enjoyable content designed for us are we? How many audio described movies are there on the iTunes store? How many DAISY books are there really available that aren't literary as opposed to academic? You'll find that DAISY's uptake is pretty pore and that is a real VI format with so much potential and promise - that's for a different discussion. I'm not responding to be difficult, just offering an interesting perspective. If mods ban me for it, then so be it. I don't want to be a part of a community that pirates because the world owes them. All the best -James-

Submitted by jrjolley (not verified) on Monday, June 11, 2012

I didn't notice that alex had posted a guide on how to strip DRM until i'd posted that lengthy response. The fact that you have to go through all those steps to do it means that many people will crack it to steal the content. So what, you have paid for books in the first place, so have many book share members in the United States and look at how much piracy goes on there. Ban this guy, if not that, seriously moderate the guides.

Hi James, your points are all interesting, I think perhaps we should discuss this privately rather than on this apps thread, as otherwise it will become cluttered with junk, but I understand if you don't want to give your e mail out publicly. but to answer you, I don't look on this as piracy at all. You say publishers have rights and in principal I agree with you, however, the fact that apple books are only readable on apple devices doesn't really give us choice, it gives us the elusion of choice, because apple has the monopoly on reading. If apple were to create a system with publishers where content could be licensed to a set number of devices rather than only apple devices this would be much better. I would have no issue with that at all, if the license said you can use these files on two or three devices of your choice enforced by some sort of software that would be fine with me, as I would have the freedom to do what I wanted, but within limits, and in fact I think that's how audible do things, they don't restrict you to particular brands of mp3 players, they give you an option to use content on the pc, and an option to burn on to cd, that in my view is the way this content should be handled, as they try to satisfy all there users and don't just force you to use one kind of device for using content. responding to your points about described movies, there aren't any on the itunes store, but there aren't any on netflicks either, so I think your point is irrelevant in this context. Regarding Daisi format, personally I don't find it a very useful format, particularly in the books its used in. I can see for academic texts it could be of use, but I just don't find it at all useful in fiction for example. Regarding the rnib and books it publishes, did you know that the cds it sends its books out on have no drm or restrictions on? so in theory anyone could make rnib based books available on line. But, the crucial point is they haven't, I haven't scene any on torrent sites for example. so if publishers were really bothered about drm and protecting themselves, why haven't they insisted the rnib uses it? your point about music playing on a wide number of devices extends to books, some people might not like the speech on the I devices for reading, you make it sound like we should be greatful for small things we are given, without campaigning for freedom of choice. I would venture to suggest that the iBooks monopoly is more for apples benefit than the publishers.

Again, i'll go through point by point as best as possible. 1. "I don't look on this as piracy at all. You say publishers have rights and in principal I agree with you, however, the fact that apple books are only readable on apple devices doesn't really give us choice, it gives us the elusion of choice, because apple has the monopoly on reading. If apple were to create a system with publishers where content could be licensed to a set number of devices rather than only apple devices this would be much better." I think you don't really get what I am suggesting. I think that iBooks is, in effect, the experience of both purchasing/reading the books. I genuinely don't consider Apple to have any monopoly on reading at all, in fact quite the reverse. iBooks isn't the only format. It's as if you are suggesting that Apple are somehow wrong to want to protect there content. Your point on an audible like system for device authorisation is already in effect. Apple allows you to use iBooks on various devices within that ecosystem. 2. "If the license said you can use these files on two or three devices of your choice enforced by some sort of software that would be fine with me, as I would have the freedom to do what I wanted, but within limits, and in fact I think that's how audible do things, they don't restrict you to particular brands of mp3 players, they give you an option to use content on the pc, and an option to burn on to cd, that in my view is the way this content should be handled, as they try to satisfy all there users and don't just force you to use one kind of device for using content." Again, it is the reading experience that Apple is marketing. iBooks isn't just a press play and listen system. There are many functions in the iBooks app, especially for the more academic books that make it a serious program. Anyone that suggests that Audible have the right idea is also deluded, many crack that content also. 3. "responding to your points about described movies, there aren't any on the itunes store, but there aren't any on netflicks either, so I think your point is irrelevant in this context. Hardly but i'll not argue. Audio described content isn't all that popular generally though so I do take that point. 4. "with.Regarding Daisi format, personally I don't find it a very useful format, particularly in the books its used in. I can see for academic texts it could be of use, but I just don't find it at all useful in fiction for example." Depends on the fiction. I can think of some fiction books that were marked up well enough that the navigation is worth it. Even just to have appropriate chapter marking and phrase navigation is enough for many readers. DAISY is expandable in that way, depends on how producers want to mark up the books. 5. "Regarding the rnib and books it publishes, did you know that the cds it sends its books out on have no drm or restrictions on? so in theory anyone could make rnib based books available on line. But, the crucial point is they haven't, I haven't scene any on torrent sites for example. so if publishers were really bothered about drm and protecting themselves, why haven't they insisted the rnib uses it?" Perhaps they are unaware. Also, they state on each book that it is provided under a specific licence. I am sure that distributing the books on sites would still get you in to trouble. Take that point up with the RNIB, if they don't want to protect there content, that's there look out. As I see it, many of the older DAISY machines can't handle DRM properly anyway." 6. "your point about music playing on a wide number of devices extends to books, some people might not like the speech on the I devices for reading, you make it sound like we should be greatful for small things we are given, without campaigning for freedom of choice. I would venture to suggest that the iBooks monopoly is more for apples benefit than the publishers." I would suggest that you are wrong on this, we use technology that is appropriate for us. If we don't like the speech on iPhones, don't buy them. I don't personally like Eloquence on PC's because it sounds like a strangled gorilla. Really, the choice is simple. Buy the books on iPhones and deal with the Apple experience or don't. You seem to think that freedom extends to all areas of computing, it unfortunately doesn't. I agree with those who understand that when you pay for software or a book, you are licensing it. That is the nature of things today. As to us being grateful, we should be just that. We have been given some really good quality access to mainstream devices. How many companies have gone out of there way? Either way, this is going round in circles and you'll do what you want I suspect. All I wanted to do was put forward some debate, I don't want to spend all day arguing on this - it's not worth it.

Sure you can read rtf files, however if they are compressed, the app simply prompts you whether you want to copy or open it. If you open, it extracts the files to the folder and keep the original zip file intact.

Submitted by alex wallis on Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Hi, I had a number of questions about app features, and received a very detailed helpful reply from the developer. The reply is so useful, I thought I would paste it hear in case anyone is having trouble with the app. From the sound of things they are really keen to be helpful. They identified that the epub files I was having trouble reading with VoiceOver did cause the app problems so it wasn't me doing anything wrong. the developers message reads, Hi Alex, It seems that there is something wrong reading your epub files, we'll fix this issue in the new version. And for the "indx" tab, it should be called "index", we'll rename it in the new version. The "up" tab refers to "navigate to previous page" and the "down" tab refers to "navigate to the next page". There are "left" and "right" buttons on the bottom, which means "go back" and "go forward" respectively, similar to those in a web browser. You said that you would like to hide the modification date for files and folders, do you like to hide the size information too? CHM+ reader already includes bookmark functionality, but seems difficult for you to use. To bookmark something, you need to select some text, and then tap on the "bookmark" menu item, you may need to tap on the ">>" menu item in order to find the "bookmark" menu item. To access the bookmarks, tap on the index tab, and then switch to "bookmarks" by taping on the "bookmarks" tab button, and then select an item from the bookmarks. You need to switch back to "Contents" later if you need to navigate through the table of contents. We do not plan to support the .lit format since Microsoft is discontinuing support for this format. Support for the .rar file format is already included, you need to extract it in the app and a folder with the same name without the .rar extension will be created, you can find the extracted files in that folder. You can open a document with another app by long pressing on the item in the document list, then tap on the "Open In..." menu item and select an app from the popup list, but this seems not easy to do. Should there be any more question please let us know. Thank you very much! Best Regards, Langui.net

Submitted by muharrem on Wednesday, June 13, 2012

hi, I am looking for an E book reader app, but I cannot decide which one is most useable. so it seems to be .pdf format will be accessible in the future. but also .doc, .docx formats are accessible?

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