EyeNote

Last modified
Wednesday, October 4, 2017
Category

Description of App

EyeNote is a mobile device application to denominate Federal Reserve Notes (U.S. paper currency) as an aid for the blind or visually impaired to increase
accessibility. Users can have the denomination of a note scanned and communicated back to the user.

Version 2.0 of EyeNote now includes a continuous scanning. Unlike the previous EyeNote version which needed a tap on screen to capture an image of the
bank note and then denominate, version 2.0 utilizes continuous recognition with no need to hold the iPhone still or capture a photo. The scanning shall
commence once the application has loaded and denominate the currency.

EyeNote version 2.0 works on the iPhone 3Gs, the iPhone 4 and 4S, the iPhone 5 and 5S, the 4th Generation iPod touch and greater, and iPad 2 and greater.

This application does not authenticate a note as either real or counterfeit. Please refer to the license agreement on the iTunes App Store.

Version

2.0

Free or Paid

Free

Apple Watch Support

Not Known

Device(s) App Was Tested On

iPhone
iPhone

Accessibility Comments

You may leave VoiceOver on, though it is not required.

VoiceOver Performance

VoiceOver reads all page elements.

Button Labeling

All buttons are clearly labeled.

Usability

The app is fully accessible with VoiceOver and is easy to navigate and use.

Other Comments

Requires iOS 4.0 or later

Recommendations

2 people have recommended this app

Most recently recommended by Rakesh Babu 5 years ago

Options

Comments

Submitted by Sam Troia on Thursday, April 28, 2011

Being free, I decided to try this app on my iPod 64 4th gen and, after making sure that lighting was sufficient (that is, the same as I use for LookTel's MoneyReader), I tried reading a bill but without any success at all. I have MoneyReader and it's one of the best apps I've ever spent $1.99 on. I do hope EyeNote works better on the iPhone, especially since it's free.

Submitted by Darrell Shandr… on Thursday, April 28, 2011

In reply to by Sam Troia

EyeNote does not work for me, either. I've seen a report from someone who got it to work with great difficulty. I believe that, in its current form, EyeNote doesn't work and I can't recommend it at this time.

Submitted by Gena on Sunday, January 8, 2012

I have the iPhone 4S and have had great success with the EyeNote App. It has not failed to correctly identify any bill that I put in front of it. It is easy to use. Occasionally I have to readjust the distance between the iPhone and the bill but, it works just as they say it does. I highly recommend it. I'm totally blind and it did take me a few practice tries to get used to the positioning of the dollar and the positioning of the distance between the dollar and the phone but, after a few minutes, I had it working like a pro. Try it, it's great.

I'm all for options and choices. It's just that the money reader doesn't require any getting used to. It just seems to work everytime.

Submitted by Esther on Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Version 2.0 of EyeNote, released December 13, 2013, runs much more smoothly than the previous version.  The big change is that by using continuous scanning video mode, the identification is faster and more accurate, and users no longer have to tap the screen to take a picture of the bill for recognition to take place. I ran EyeNote on my iPhone 5, and compared the performance with LookTel Moneyreader.  MoneyReader's response is faster, especially in auto-adjusting to low light level situations, but the new version EyeNote performed quite reasonably.  The biggest difference was in the ability and speed of recognizing crumpled or folded bills: you may need to be more careful about flattening bills when you use EyeNote. MoneyReader copes much better with these cases and can recognize the bills in most instances, while EyeNote will take longer and may not succeed unless you hold the bill at a very precise distance away and does not cope as well with folds in the notes, but again, the EyeNote app performed much better than I expected from experience with the previous version.

There is also a nice privacy feature that is reminiscent of a similar feature that was present in earlier versions of LookTel MoneyReader – you can set the app to either play tones or vibrate instead of having it speak the note denominations.  This can be configured in the main Settings App, where the EyeNote entry can either be set with the "Show Settings" switch button to "On", to display the Privacy options as buttons at the bottom of the EyeNote app screen ("Speak", "Tone", or "Vibrate"), or a default Privacy option can be chosen.

Appended below is the current app description, followed by the detailed notes given at the web page http://www.eyenote.gov/

Version 2.0 EyeNote App Description:

EyeNote is a mobile device application to denominate Federal Reserve Notes (U.S. paper currency) as an aid for the blind or visually impaired to increase accessibility. Users can have the denomination of a note scanned and communicated back to the user. 

Version 2.0 of EyeNote now includes a continuous scanning. Unlike the previous EyeNote version which needed a tap on screen to capture an image of the bank note and then denominate, version 2.0 utilizes continuous recognition with no need to hold the iPhone still or capture a photo. The scanning shall commence once the application has loaded and denominate the currency. EyeNote version 2.0 works on the iPhone 3Gs, the iPhone 4 and 4S, the iPhone 5 and 5S, the 4th Generation iPod touch and greater, and iPad 2 and greater.  This application does not authenticate a note as either real or counterfeit. Please refer to the license agreement on the iTunes App Store.

Notes from the http://www.eyenote.gov/ web site:

The EyeNote® application (app) was developed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) for the blind or visually impaired to use as a tool to increase accessibility to Federal Reserve Notes (U.S. paper currency). EyeNote® is built for the Apple iOS to allow the user to scan a bank note and communicate its value back to the user.

The app is available as a free download on the Apple App Store℠. It runs without any special filters or background material. A data connection is not required for the app to work.

Features

  • OneTouch, hand-held operation.
  • Face or back of note to camera.
  • Partial note recognition (note can be handheld).
  • Any circular orientation.
  • No equipment modification, special background materials or special lighting required.
  • Camera flash is not required.
  • No data connection required - all processing on device.
  • Currency designs from Series 1996 and forward.
  • Note can be on a complex background.
  • 2-4 second response time.
  • User selectable spoken output English or Spanish, based on device language setting.
  • Spoken mode also indicates the front or back of note to assist in vending use.
  • Simplified on screen instructions (read aloud when device is set to VoiceOver in Accessibility mode)

EyeNote® does not authenticate a note as being either genuine or counterfeit. Please refer to the license agreement on the Apple App Store℠ for additional information. For questions or comments regarding the EyeNote® app contact us at EyeNote@bep.gov.

Installing and Using the EyeNote® App

Installation and Setup

Once the EyeNote® app has been downloaded to the user's device the app icon should be placed either on the bottom left or right corner of the screen for easy access, or in the app dock. This will allow for easy access to easily locate and launch the app when needed. If you put the EyeNote® app icon as the only icon on the dock, it will center itself and always be located just above the Home button.

Using the EyeNote® App

Once the EyeNote® app has been downloaded, launch the app.  The user will launch the app from an icon on the iOS device. The new version 2.0 of the EyeNote application (“App”) will utilize a continuous scan function. The continuous scanning shall commence once the application has loaded. The new Version 2.0 will utilize VoiceOver for vocal and gesture feedback if it is turned on for the target iOS device.

Scanning Notes

To complete a successful scan, the note should be positioned 6 to 8 inches away from the camera. The app must scan more than half of the note to recognize it. Adequate natural or artificial lighting is required for proper scanning, for ideal scanning conditions limit hand movement to reduce image blur. For best results, place the note on a flat surface.

EyeNote® Features and Optional Settings

The EyeNote® app uses image recognition technology and the device's integrated camera to recognize bank notes and communicate the result back to the user. All current circulating notes from 1996 forward can be recognized by the app:

  • One Dollar bill (1)
  • Two Dollar bill (2)
  • Five Dollar bill (5)
  • Ten Dollar bill (10)
  • Twenty Dollar bill (20)
  • Fifty Dollar bill (50)
  • One Hundred Dollar bill (100)

The EyeNote® app supports English and Spanish languages. The device's language setting determines the EyeNote® app voice setting. Switch languages by changing the device's settings menu option. If the device language setting is set to a language other than English or Spanish, the app will default to English. The device's volume controls determine how loud the result is spoken. For privacy in Spoken mode, the user can use the devices earphones.

In Spoken mode, the app "speaks" the denomination of the note and identifies if the front or back of the note was scanned. For example: "One Dollar Front" or "Twenty Dollars Back". The front or back orientation is spoken to assist when needed for vending usage. The spoken message for an unsuccessful scan is "Error, Reposition".

The other selectable output is Privacy mode. In Privacy mode, the app will not speak the denomination, but will communicate results back to the user with a pulse pattern (see below). On the iPhone®, Privacy mode uses the vibration buzzer for the pulses. On the iPod® Touch and iPad® 2, Privacy mode uses an audible beep for the pulses. The patterns follow an easy sequential pattern:

  • One Dollar is 1 pulse.
  • Two Dollars is 2 pulses.
  • Five Dollars is 3 pulses.
  • Ten Dollars is 4 pulses.
  • Twenty Dollars is 5 pulses.
  • Fifty Dollars is 6 pulses.
  • One Hundred Dollars is 7 pulses.
  • Error, reposition is 8 rapid pulses.

Make sure you set your device correctly:

Go to Settings, then Sounds. There are 2 Vibrate setting switches on this screen. At the top of the Sounds screen there is Silent, with a vibrate switch setting; this switch does not matter for the EyeNote® to vibrate. Scrolling down the screen there is another Vibrate switch just above Ringtone. This Vibrate setting has to be set to ON for EyeNote® to vibrate on an iPhone®.

EyeNote® FAQ

1. What is EyeNote®?

EyeNote is a mobile device application to identify denominations of Federal Reserve Notes (U.S. paper currency) as an aid for the blind or visually impaired.

2. What devices will EyeNote work on?

All iPhone®, iPod®, iPod® Touch iOS devices that have a camera, including iPhone 5®, iPhone 5s®, iPad mini® and iOS7.1®.

3. How EyeNote 2.0 differs from EyeNote 1.0?

The BEP has developed version 2.0 of Eyenote, to include a continuous scanning. The new release utilizes continuous recognition with no need to hold the iPhone still or capture a photo. Once EyeNote 2.0 scans the note it will denominate the currency.

4. Why wasn't the continuous scanning feature introduced in EyeNote 1.0?

Continuous scanning feature require video technology. The first generation iOS devices were not equipped with video technology.

5. When will EyeNote be available?

The app is available now from the Apple App StoreSM for free.

6. Will a user need to have a data plan or any other accessory to make EyeNote work?

No. EyeNote is designed to be 100% functional without the need for a cellular or Wi-Fi data connection. No other accessory is required.

7. The iPhone®, iPod® Touch and iPad® have a touch screen and few distinguishable buttons or keys, how will a blind person use EyeNote?

The development team certainly realizes this. EyeNote is designed to be as close to a ‘OneTouch’ app to maximize use by a user with no vision. Starting from this point, the program is positioned for future development on other platforms as the industry moves to touch screens as a common offering in mobile devices. The app launch icon can be fixed on the Dock so that it is always in the same location for the user to activate.

8. Will a user have to specially align or hold the banknote to the device?

No special alignment will be required. EyeNote was designed to work when the banknote is held in one hand and the mobile device is in the other hand - real life conditions - front, back, at an angle, or partially covered by a hand.

9. How will the user know what the denomination is?

There will be a user-selectable choice of spoken word output (English or Spanish) using the device’s speaker or specially keyed vibrations/tones to identify the note denomination when privacy is required.

10. As currency or the devices change, how will the app be updated?

The app will be updated to recognize changing designs to currency as they are developed. Also, EyeNote will work with the new $100 banknote after its introduction into circulation. As platforms advance for which there is already an EyeNote app, the app will be updated to stay current. Using the features of the App Store, users will receive automatic notifications that updates are available.

11. Why is the Government doing this program when there is also discussion of providing a tactile feature and providing a free standalone Reader?

The app is not in lieu-of any other accommodation; it is in addition-to all other programs the Government is considering. It simply provides another option for the public which would preclude a user from having to carry a separate reader if they also own a compatible mobile device.

12. Why are there on screen instructions when the app is designed for people who cannot see?

These instructions are a quick reference on how to use the app. When the device is in VoiceOver mode (an Accessibility feature that Apple provides) these quick instructions are read aloud to the user. Complete use instructions are available at www.eyenote.gov.

13. Does EyeNote detect counterfeit notes?

No. EyeNote only identifies the denomination of the note.

14. Where can I get more information?

http://www.eyenote.gov/ and download from iTunes®.

Submitted by Orko on Monday, October 20, 2014

Went I went looking for an app to help identify money, I search the app store and google for money identification apps for IOS devices. All I could find was LookTell Money Reader for $10 and another app that identifies coins for free. So I paid the $10 for LookTell Money Reader.

Since EyeNote was free, I downloaded it and did my own side-by-side tests.

Although EyeNote had more features, LookTell Money Reader was faster and more reliable when actually identifying bills.

In conclusion; if I had found EyeNote first, for free, I'd have accepted it being slower and not always reliable in being able to identify a bill. But since I already have LookTell Money Reader, its speed and reliability were well worth the $10 paid, so I don't regret buying it.

I guess this is proof of the old adage, "You get what you pay for."

Submitted by Voracious P. Brain on Tuesday, November 18, 2014

I've never tried Look-Tell, but have never experienced a problem or significant delay using EyeNote. Love the fact that you never need to hit *any* controls: just start showing the phone money and it speaks the denomination plus front/back. U.S. currency, of course: it's from the U.S. Treasury. I use it a lot and find it very efficient. Wish I had another app that was this easy and reliable.

Submitted by Maria Reyes on Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Does anybody know why when I open the app it doesn't give me buttons or voiceover doesn't talk? And where do i put the bill to scan it?

Submitted by dvdmth on Wednesday, July 8, 2015

There are no buttons in the app normally, though that can be changed in the EyeNote settings in the Settings app.

Just place the bill in front of the camera a short distance away, and EyeNote will announce it as soon as you have it in proper position, provided there is good enough light. If you can't get the app to work, make sure the app has permission to use the camera, which can be controlled in the Settings app.

It may take some trial and error, but after some practice the app becomes pretty easy to use.

The bill should be held horizontally. It doesn't matter if it is upside down, nor does it matter if the front or back of the bill is facing the camera. EyeNote will actually tell you if it is seeing the front or back of the bill when it tells you what it is.

Submitted by JeffB on Sunday, April 10, 2016

Do to the distence away from the bill the phone has to be with no indacation or light option with in the app. I can't see this being very useful for on the go.