Is There a Guide on How to Use iMovie for iOS with VoiceOver?

Hi all, is there a guide on how to use iMovie on ios with voiceover? Thanks

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#1 Try searching the

Try searching the Applevis site. If not, you can try searching for iMovie guides in http://www.google.com. Hope this helps and good luck!

#2 Did you ever find a guide? I

Did you ever find a guide? I would be interested to

#3 Inquiring minds wanna know

Club AppleVis Member

Even if there isn't a guide, has anyone out there been able to use iMovie with voiceover? If it is doable, I don't mind figuring it out on my own and reporting what I find. Would love to be able to edit videos of the family.

#4 Its easy enough.

There are no guides out there that really help. The VO drag and drop commands make it possible to place transitions where ever you want them.
Imovie has a list of key commands that all work nice in the help menu
I am completely blind and produce fishing videos along with my own music. Feel free to explore my channel to get a feel for it.

youtube.com/eli709

It took me many days to figure this out but once you get it its easy.

#5 but answer came there none.

I think the answer is no. I am totally blind and at the moment I am using a mixture of audio and still pictures on my Youtube channel. I don't like this cop out and want to do better. I know people do make real videos on youtube without any sight. What I don't know is how. I know that, using a tripod, I could steady and focus the camera. Using a light ring or selfi light I could produce a good, soft, natural looking light at all times so that my videos would always look good. But how do I edit them to take out the phone talking, or any mistakes I make, or put in music, or anything else I want to do? This I don't know. We need a guide, or a podcast on this subject, we really do! Plese, can anyone help?

#6 Maybe this is what you're looking for?

I recently started a series on YouTube about using iMovie on the iPhone using voiceover. Check it out here, like, comment, share, and subscribe for more. I'm trying to spread the word in case anyone is interested, but unless I'm a developer on this website, I cannot directly make a post about it.
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRBjoeUgOAvNNP-dvz3uGn6kf3YYoHEkG

#7 You're not the only one

Hi there
For the moment, I also use still pictures and audio on my channel because I don't have a tripod. I don't want to put my phone anywhere in case it falls or anything like that, but it seems to be working for me. The good thing about it is that I'm passionate about it, and I'm getting content out there.

#8 Blind YouTubing

Hey Jacey,

I will definitely check out your channel! I’ve made a few attempts at starting up a channel myself but I can’t quite decide on a format or what content I want to focus on. Aside from that, I find the visual aspects of posting content to be intimidating because, for obvious reasons, I can’t really tell if something looks right or not. For example, I want to go on Google images and find pictures I could use for thumbnails, still frames and other things but can barely see the images even when I zoom in on them using my computer. The descriptions of the images aren’t necessarily reliable either. Then there is the actual video it’s self which is a whole other ball of wax. If I may ask, do you have enough vision to see your videos and images when working with them? If not, what tricks have you discovered for using photos and videos effectively as a blind YouTuber? Thank you!

#9 Being a blind YouTuber

Honestly, I need to do a whole series on this. Here is the thing though.
Well, I wouldn't say that it's easy, but it can be done. It's hard getting content out there and coming up with ideas, producing the videos and getting them uploaded. For me, this channel is mine, so I post what I want, whenever I want, and I share the videos around. If people choose to subscribe, great, if not, YouTube is a very large platform and so they don't have to watch my videos if they don't wan to. Yeah, you're totally going to have negative comments and what not, but if you're channel is for you, then it's not really a problem. As for getting content out there, I'm totally blind, but I have found some pretty interesting workarounds to get content out there. So, my channel is basically a mixture of still pictures of myself that I add voiceover to, and sometimes I even add live captions so the words are shown on screen when I'm talking, sometimes I have someone film for me, and I also post a few tutorials which are screen recordings that I overlay a picture of myself to.
I use music, sound effects and anything I can to make my videos interesting. When it comes to finding pictures, I usually ask a friend to find one for me, and then send them to me, or, if you look around, you are bound to find websites with pictures which are described, especially if that website is dedicated to photography and filming.
However, if you want to film for yourself, the first thing to understand is that you're not always going to get a perfect shot, so getting honest feedback is essential. What I would recommend is to get a tripod and set up your phone or whatever device that you're going to be using to film on there, or you can go the more expensive route and purchase a go Pro camera. With a camera, you have a wider lens to work with, and even though the go Pro cameras are not necessarily for the blind, it does have voice commands which can be very helpful, so you can ask someone to set it up for you, or you can play around to find out what works and what doesn't. The GoPro cameras have voice commands such as: start recording, stop recording, zoom, burst mode, take photo and so on.
When it comes to getting content out there, my best advice is to be consistent. You don't have to post every day, and it doesn't have to be on one topic. What I've done is to, like I said, post what I want, but I have arranged my topics into playlists so that my content is easier to find. Either way, my best advice overall is to get started and see what happens from there.